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For Alumni and Friends of The State University of New Jersey

The New Rutgers
Vocational Training

on the banks

Vocational Training

How five fraternity brothers at Rutgers–Newark became prominent judges in New Jersey.

Her Big Plans for the Big Ten

scarlet sports

Her Big Plans for the Big Ten

Julie Hermann, the new athletic director, is laying the groundwork for Rutgers' entry into the elite athletic conference.

  • Recipe for Success

    Why head coach Kyle Flood believes the football team will go places during the 2013 season.

  • The Doctor of Sports

    As the Rutgers team physician, Robert Monaco oversees the latest in sports medicine in order to keep athletes playing their best.

Paintings by Painter

the arts

Paintings by Painter

Historian-turned-artist Nell Irvin Painter hunts for not only the literal truth of history, but also the figurative truth of art.

  • The View From on High

    The photography and paintings of Diane Burko, on view at the Zimmerli.

  • A Hair-Raising Experience

    An all-male dance company founded by a dance professor goes for the lesser-appreciated facets of male dancing.

Mining the Depths of Despair

insights

Mining the Depths of Despair

Sociologist Julie Phillips explains the steady rise in suicides among Baby Boomers—and perhaps why the trend won't end with this generation.

  • Discoveries

    Recent breakthroughs and findings in faculty research.

  • New Virtual Sheriff in Town

    A Rutgers–Camden law professor studies the legal implications of freewheeling online communities.

First in Class

alumni notes

First in Class

Among the first African-American men to attend Rutgers, and later an early incarnation of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Charles H. Bowers Jr. broke down barriers.

  • A Law School Runs Through It

    The law schools of Rutgers have figured prominently in the successful careers of three generations of the Rose family.

  • Little Big Man

    Too small to play football, alumnus Shiro Watari did practice with the team, with an ardor later used to promote the sport in Japan.